Migraine Awareness Month

Migraine Awareness Month

It’s summertime for sure, now. The sun is not going down till almost 9 P.M. and the evening air is still warm. Lightning bugs are out, and unfortunately so are the mosquitoes. The temps are up and the kids are home. The changes in schedules and routines can be stressful, but also lead to headaches.

If you have more headaches in the summer months, you are not alone. In fact, summertime tends to be the highest headache (migraines, especially) time of the year.

water-2105211_640June is Migraine Awareness Month and it never hurts to brush up on ways to stave off headaches, so here are some things to keep in mind this summer:

1)      Stay hydrated
2)      Get plenty of downtime/sleep
3)      Stick with your routine, whatever it may be
4)      Wear hats or sunglasses while outside

A migraine is described as a headache of varying intensity, often accompanied by nausea and sensitivity to light and sound. It often comes with severe throbbing or pulsing sensation, usually just on one side of your brain. The MayoClinic.com says, “Migraine attacks can cause significant pain for hours to days and can be so severe that the pain is disabling.”

Stats show approximately 13% of the US population suffers from chronic migraines, about 5 million of those experience one of more attacks per month! Ninety-one percent of those with migraines will miss work and just cannot function during an attack.

How does one know when a migraine is imminent? Well, there are a few warning signs that a migraine is coming on that include:

  • flashes of light,
  • blind spots,
  • or tingling on one side of the face
  • or in your arm or leg.

Migraines also tend to go through four stages (prodrome, aura, headache and post-drome) during one’s lifetime, but not all stages may be experienced by everyone.

Once a migraine has settled in, it usually lasts about 72 hours if not treated. Some people experience more than one a month, others may only have a couple a year, but either way, migraines can be debilitating!

One treatment that is very beneficial but not always thought of is massage therapy. It can relieve muscle spasms, improve blood flow and circulation, relieve tension and promoting relaxation. 

headache-1557812_640However, many migraine sufferers have an extreme sensitivity to touch, and many find any movement increases pain levels. Some feel massage during an attack would be out of the question. However, light hand or foot massage during pain could help. It is thought that massaging these areas improves the circulation, helping to reduce pressure in the head which is often a big factor of migraines.

Keeping headaches at bay for some is a daily battle. If you would be interested in adding neuromuscular massage therapy to your routine, I encourage you to call me to see just how it can help you!

I’d love to talk to you about a plan for your health. Whether you suffer from migraines, fibromyalgia, or a sports injury, I want to help find the source and relieve your pain. Pain should not be holding you back from the life you want to live. “Where pain becomes relief” is not just my motto, it is my way of life.

 

 

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Michelle Heniff

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